Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah
Picture of Utah

Governor Kicks Off Clear the Air Challenge

PR NewsWire
June 7, 2011

Utah Governor Gary R. Herbert w ill be joined by the Salt Lake City mayor and Salt Lake County mayor to kick off the annual Clear the Air Challenge and encourage Utahns to use mass transit to improve air quality and escape high gas prices w ith an old fashioned w histle-stop tour of Northern Utah on FrontRunner. The Governor w ill also announce the launch of the new Travel Wise Mobile Tracker, a system for smart phones and mobile devices to track personal travel and measure money, miles, gas and emissions saved by using Travel Wise strategies.

Utah Governor Gary R. Herbert, Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker, Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon and UTA Board Chair Greg Hughes w ill speak in Salt Lake City. Governor Herbert, Mayor Becker and Representative Hughes w ill continue to Woods Cross and Ogden, w here Ogden Mayor Matthew Godfrey w ill greet them. County and local officials and dignitaries w ill join the event at each stop.

Events Today, Monday, June 6, 2011

9:00 AM – Program, Salt Lake Intermodal Hub, 250 S. 600 West, Salt Lake City
9:27 AM – board train for Woods Cross
9:40 AM – arrive Woods Cross FrontRunner station, 750 S. 800 West, Woods Cross
10:07 AM– board train for Ogden
10:46 AM – arrive Ogden FrontRunner station, 2350 S. Wall Ave., Ogden
11:16 AM – board train for Salt Lake
11:54 AM – train arrives in Woods Cross
12:09 PM – train arrives in Salt Lake

Copyright © 2013 PR Newswire Association LLC.

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Gov, mayors kick off 2011 Clean Air Challenge

KSL
Celeste Tholen Rosenlof

June 6, 2011

SALT LAKE CITY -- As UTA extends its TRAX lines and weather becomes accommodating to biking and walking, Salt Lake County encourages using mass transit, carpooling and other methods of transportation between June 13 and July 10.

Since 2009, Salt Lake County has held the Clear the Air Challenge in an effort to reduce pollution in the valley. The challenge encourages Utahns to take advantage of mass transit, carpooling and other methods of transportation instead of driving themselves.

Kicking off this year's challenge Monday morning, Governor Gary Herbert, Salt Lake City Mayor Ralph Becker, and Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon rode the FrontRunner from Salt Lake to Woods Cross, to Ogden and back. The message is to drive less and smarter.

"The air we breathe is a concern for every resident. To improve our air quality, we each play a role," said Mayor Becker. "We have seen the numbers. We can make a substantial difference when we thoughtfully plan our travel."

Those numbers, from the 2010 challenge, amounted to two million pounds of emissions reduced from the air. This year, challenge organizers hope to

reduce 3.4 million pounds of emissions, two million vehicle miles and 300,000 vehicle trips.

© 2013 ksl.com | KSL Broadcasting Salt Lake City UT

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The Clear the Air Challenge dares you to drive less and drive smarter

Examiner
Shad Engkilterra

6/7/2011

On June 10, 2011 at the Gallivan Center, there will be a Clear the Air Fair starting at 6:00pm with music, games and a movie at 9:00 with free popcorn. This event kicks of the 3rd Annual Clear the Air Challenge, which begins on June 13, 2011 and continues through July 10, 2011.

The objectives for the Challenge include encouraging “people to try something new” and “to reduce single occupant (motor vehicle) trips,” said Kate Lilja, sustainability special programs manager. Ideas to achieve these goals include:

  • Take public transportation
  • Walk or bike to your destination (called “active transportation”)
  • Teleworking – working from home
  • A compressed or flexible work week
  • Carpooling
  • Trip chaining – planning trips so that they happen at the same time rather than driving to each individual destination and home again.

According to Kate, automobiles account for more than 50% of the air pollution that Utah experiences. The 3rd Annual Clear the Air Challenge offers people the opportunity to make a difference in their local air quality. Participants will need to track their trips and miles. Kate stated that she used Google maps to track her miles in a trip and found that she often repeated the same trip, so she only needed to look it up once. To register for the Challenge, visit the web site here. Prizes will be given out weekly to those who make their goals. Participants may register as individuals or teams, and businesses are encouraged to participate. For more information, check out their YouTube Channel here. If you like this article, please use the subscribe button near the top of the page. It’s free and you will receive an email every time I publish a new article. Comments are always welcome and may be made near the bottom of the page. According to Kate, automobiles account for more than 50% of the air pollution that Utah experiences. The 3rd

Annual Clear the Air Challenge offers people the opportunity to make a difference in their local air quality. Participants will need to track their trips and miles. Kate stated that she used Google maps to track her miles in a trip and found that she often repeated the same trip, so she only needed to look it up once. To register for the Challenge, visit the web site here. Prizes will be given out weekly to those who make their goals. Participants may register as individuals or teams, and businesses are encouraged to participate. For more information, check out their YouTube Channel here. If you like this article, please use the subscribe button near the top of the page. It’s free and you will receive an email every time I publish a new article. Comments are always welcome and may be made near the bottom of the page.

© 2006-2013 Clarity Digital Group LLC
Examiner.com

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Clear The Air Fair

CityWeekly
06-09-2011 » Page 22

Bike commuting pay s off, and riders are shedding more than pounds from their hips: In just two summers, Clear the Air Challenge participants have dropped 4.1 million pounds of emissions and reduced 2.4 million single-occupant vehicle road miles, says Kate Lilja, Salt Lake City Sustainability special programs manager. Motor vehicles contribute to approximately 50 percent of the Wasatch Front’s air pollution, so alternative transportation is the program’s focus. Over the four-week program, registered individuals and teams track their commuting on ClearTheAirChallenge.org, and winners are awarded with trophies and prizes. But with summer ozone pollution reduced,everyone wins.

An evening of information and fun, the Clear the Air Fair will launch the 2011 campaign. Organizational partners—the Department of Air Quality, Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Transit Authority, Road Respect and more—nonprofits and activists will provide information and answer questions about preventing dirty air. It’s not all facts and stats, though. There will be kids’ activities, food vendors, entertainment from the Scales and Tails reptile show and music from B.D. Howes Band and the Folka Dots. (Austen Diamond)

Clear the Air Fair @ Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 801-535-6110,

June 10, 6-9 p.m., free. CleartheAirChallenge.org
Date: Jun 10, 2011
Time: 6-9 p.m.
Phone: 801-535-6117
Address: 239 S. Main
Where: Gallivan Center

© Copyright 2013 Copperfield Publishing

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Utah's pollution problem: Small steps making positive impact for air quality

Deseret News
Kassi Cox
Thursday, March 31, 2011

Forbes Magazine recently labeled Utah one of the country's most toxic states — a designation that could create concern about the health of residents and have negative repercussions on thestate's economic growth.

"Businesses that think about moving to Utah look at our national beauty and in order to do that they need to be able to see it," said Marty Carpenter, spokesman for the Salt Lake Chamber.
However, Carpenter was also confident that anyone who is seriously considering coming to Utah will see that the label does not match the state's reality.
Forbes failed to mention an increasing concern for the environment in Utah and the progress Utah citizens have made in the last few years.

Since 2007, small time players have launched big time campaigns to raise awareness about
Utah's air quality issues. Cherise Udell and Dr. Brian Moench are two Utah residents that are now the face of a couple of the largest clean air campaigns in Utah. Udell, founder of Utah Moms for Clean Air, worked with legislators such as Rep. Christine Johnson, D-Salt Lake, and Sen. JohnValentine, R-Orem, to pass bills that focus on stopping idling school buses.

"In the last couple years since we started the group, the awareness has definitely increased," said Udell. "Look at the number of news articles and you will see a huge spike since the organizations have started."

Moench, president of Physicians for a Healthy Environment, got involved in the issue after
becoming fed up by inversion, especially a rather harsh inversion period in 2007. He and eight or nine other physicians started to read medical literature about effects of pollution on the human body. Since the organization's inception, Moench has noticed that fewer people are allowing their cars to idle and has been told by moms that idling at school pick-up and drop-off points is decreasing.

Idling school buses and cars may not seem like much, but according to Utah's Division of Air Quality, 38 percent of Utah's pollution problems come from cars and trucks.
"We want idling to become a social faux pas," said Udell, "the way throwing trash out your window has become."

To help with vehicle emissions, Utah has also become a more bike-friendly state. Salt Lake
City was given a bronze-level award as a bicycle community by the League of American Bicyclists in 2007, and was upgraded to the silver level in 2010.

"The gold level award is in the mayor's initiative," said Becka Roolf, bicycle and pedestrian
coordinator, "And personally I'm not going to be satisfied at stopping at gold, I'm going for
platinum."

Utah's bad air is also caused by three other major categories. Large industrial contributers are 28 percent of the problem, with commercial use following in close second at 26 percent. The last 8 percent comes from household pollutions.

According to Arden Pope, professor at Brigham Young University and one of the world's leading experts in small particulate pollution and its health effects, the pollution problem hasn't increased alongside the population increase the state has experienced in the last couple of years. And that's a victory of sorts.

"We haven't gotten worse, while the numbers of cars on the road, the miles driven and the population have grown," said Pope.

Utah citizens and industries alike have made noticeable impacts to Utah's air quality since 2007.

Public officials started clean air initiatives, such as the Clear The Air Challenge issued by Gov.
Gary Herbert, Mayor Ralph Becker and Mayor Peter Corroon. The challenge encourages
travelers of all ages to use travelwise strategies. Car-pooling, public transit and bike riding
have all been deemed as travelwise ways to get around. The challenge has already saved more than 2 million pounds of vehicle emissions and more than 59,000 gallons of gas.

Utah Transit Authority has 141,000 regular passengers on weekdays and 75 percent of thosepassengers are "choice riders," according to a passenger survey UTA conducts each year.
Choice riders are people who have alternative forms of transportation but choose to ride public transit. Since January 2010, UTA has seen a 12 percent increase in ridership.

"The most common reason people ride is to save the environment," said UTA spokesman Gerry Carpenter.

UTA has also made huge strides with new requirements for their 2010 buses, which will be more environmentally friendly than automobiles manufactured in the 1990s. The whole fleet will be completely switched over to the new buses by 2015, which will reduce fleet emissions by 80 percent.

"The key is to get people out of single-occupant vehicles. Car pooling can cut emissions by 75 percent," said Carpenter, "A car with one person in it lets one pound of greenhouse gas per passenger mile, whereas a van full of people lets 1.5 pounds of green house gas per passenger mile."

Another huge concern among those who are apprehensive about Utah's air quality is Kennecott's contribution to Utah's pollution problem. The mine's owners are hoping to extend the mine's life out to at least 2028, which has some Utahns worried about its effect on air quality. But spokeswoman Jana Kettering said the mine has made significant changes in the last couple of years to cut back on emissions and help air quality.

The industry scene has painted pictures of gloomy inversion days since the industrial revolution
in the 19th century; however, the modern day industry is trying to change that reputation by following the fast-paced trail of greener technology.

The copper mine proposed plans in December that would dramatically reduce air emissions in the valley by 2014. The upgrade includes converting the majority of the onsite coal-fired power plant's boilers to a combined-cycle natural gas operation. With this conversion, the mine would generate additional power while nearly doubling the efficiency rating.

According to the Department of Environmental Quality's 2008 statewide air emissions inventory, Kennecott's combined emission contribution was responsible for 6 percent of small particulate matter, which is the air pollutant that most commonly affects health.

"Kennecott's emissions represent a small percentage of the valley's air quality problem," said Rio Tinto's Kettering. "We've shown as an industry that we care about making positive change."

Although Utah has seen improvements within the last couple years vehicle emissions continue to remain the biggest problem.

"The largest single source here in the Salt Lake valley is automobiles," said Bryce Bird, planning
branch manager with the Utah Division of Air Quality. "Anything to limit driving helps."

To learn more about the cleaning of Utah's air, visit the Mayor's Office initiative website at www.slcgov.com/mayor/initiatives/.

© 2011 Deseret News Publishing Company

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