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Rocky Mountain Power Stepping up Efforts to Reduce Vehicle Idling and Emissions

January 08, 2013

SALT LAKE CITY – Vehicle idling wastes fuel, wears out engines and contributes to air pollution. Rocky Mountain Power has implemented a new idle-free policy to prohibit unnecessary idling and reduce the emissions of its vehicle fleet. The utility also is installing GPS tracking equipment in its service vehicles to monitor idling and driving habits in order to use less gasoline, ensure the most efficient driving routes and promote a healthier environment.

Additionally, the company is researching alternative fuel options for its vehicle fleet to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels for transportation.

"Idling is bad for the environment, bad for public health and bad for business because of its impact on fuel costs," said Curt Mansfield, Rocky Mountain Power managing director of transmission and distribution support services. "We've partnered with states, counties, cities and community organizations to reduce carbon dioxide and other vehicle emissions and we're working to eliminate all idling of company vehicles with few exceptions, such as when a bucket or other equipment needs to be lifted using power from the truck's motor."

At least 13 states have anti-idling laws and a growing number of counties and cities are enforcing ordinances designed to stop unnecessary idling, including Salt Lake City and other municipalities in Rocky Mountain Power's service area. Remaining in compliance with these regulations is another reason for the company to reduce vehicle idling.

"We're doing more to communicate with employees about idling in addition to our policy changes and technology advancements," said Mansfield. "We've also developed reports to track and compare fuel economy across our vehicle fleet to help drive the improvements we expect to achieve."

Rocky Mountain Power's anti-idling initiatives were aided by its collaboration with Kennecott Utah Copper. Kennecott shared lessons learned through its idling reduction program as well as information about their experience using GPS monitoring equipment in vehicles.

"It is gratifying to be able to work with companies, like Rocky Mountain Power, who are passionate about improving air quality," said Kennecott Utah Copper Operational Services Manager Richard Kauss. "This collaboration allows us to share information that leads to significant air quality improvements."

On Jan. 15, Rocky Mountain Power representatives will be attending the Idle Free Fleets Conference sponsored by Utah Clean Cities, Kennecott Utah Copper and the State of Utah Office of Energy Development. The conference will be held at Hale Centre Theatre in West Valley City and will feature Idle Free Tool Kit information from Kennecott, an idle free technology expo and breakout sessions for government and municipal fleets, business and industry, and education. The last day to register for the free conference is Jan. 9. For more information, visit the Utah Clean Cities website.

Rocky Mountain Power participates with Utah Clean Cities and the Salt Lake Chamber Clean Air Champions to drive a reduction in emissions and dependence on fossil fuels for transportation. The company also provides useful information on our website about purchasing and charging electric vehicles, at rockymountainpower.net/ev.

Everyone can easily help reduce vehicle emissions through simple behavioral changes. Idling facts and recommendations are on the Idle Free Utah website.

Media inquiries: 800-775-7950

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