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Utah Celebrates 15 Years of Idle Free Awareness and Action for 2022-2023 Winter Season

 

September marks the 15th Annual Governor Declaration for Idle Free in Utah September 2022 and the 2022-2023 Winter Season. The Governor’s Declaration is currently supported by over 60 Utah Mayors who represent more than ¾ of the state’s population. The highly anticipated event was held on Thursday, September 1st at 11 AM at the Utah State Capitol. Key leaders and advocates for the Idle Free shared their stories, work and support of this unique Utah campaign for clean air and zero emissions. 

This is the 15th anniversary of Utah’s beloved Idle Free Campaign, “Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free” and the annual opportunity to announce Utah’s official Idle Free Month and Winter Season 2022-2023.  Today we reflect on the past 15 years with a sense of accomplishment. This initiative has inspired statewide idle free policies, as well as action by school districts, cities, towns, counties, and Zion National Park. We recognize the consistent hard work of the Bipartisan Clean Air Caucus, Utah Idle Free fleets and most importantly, the collective of individual action- a ten-second commitment to turn the key.” Tammie Bostick, Executive Director, Utah Clean Cities

In 2021, Utah Clean Cities and Intermountain Healthcare partnered to bring awareness to the impacts idling has on individual and community health through an updated signage campaign.  These updated visual images of the Idle Free signs can be seen throughout Intermountain Healthcare Campuses. Ten signs were installed at Utah Valley Hospital in September 2021. These signs remind visitors of the importance of turning off our vehicles to support the safety and well-being of employees, patients, and visitors. 

This year, we continue to applaud the efforts of those utilizing and supporting Idle Free Education Programs including Utah Clean Cities, UCAIR, Breathe Utah, Utah Society for Environmental Education and the State Health Department’s Asthma Program and Recess Guide. These grass-roots programs reach over 15,000 students, and continue to grow across 425 schools. 

The Turn your Key, Be Idle Free program recognizes the Utah cities that are officially Idle Free cities. To date, the cities of Alta, Cottonwood Heights, Draper City, Holladay, Logan, Millcreek, Murray City, Park City, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, Sandy, South Jordan and Springdale all have Idle Free City Ordinances. Zion National Park is also Idle Free.

Cameron Diehl, Utah Clean Air Partnership; Debbie Lyons, SLCgreen, SLC Sustainability; Representative Joel Briscoe, Bi-partisan Clean Air Caucus; Tammie Bostick, Utah Clean Cities; Pilar Pobil, Utah Artist

The summer of 2022 brought high temperatures across the Wasatch Front, including a record-breaking number of days above 100 degrees. Along with soaring temperatures comes an increased exposure to ground-level ozone, a pollutant formed from the reactions between Nitric Oxide (NOx), Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), heat, and sunshine. Although we cannot see or smell this harmful pollutant, ozone is unhealthy and it has been likened to getting a sunburn on our lungs. 

Ozone and PM2.5 from vehicle emissions, along with the wildfire smoke that Utahns frequently experience, negatively impacts the health of Utah communities and disproportionately affects historically disadvantaged populations. The transportation sector – both individuals and fleets – can work to lessen the harmful effects of poor air quality with simple actions, such as “turn your key, be idle free”. Local government entities, businesses, fleets and many Utah communities are raising the bar for partnership with this annual reminder to curb unnecessary idling. 

“We are excited to recognize the commitment from Utah communities with the fifteenth year of “Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free”.  We all play a part in Utah’s air quality, and even simple changes have a big impact on our air. Being idle-free, carpooling, or riding transit help every Utahn breathe easier. City leaders are striving to reduce our emissions in our buildings and vehicles. We challenge everyone to continue improving our air quality!” – Cameron Diehl, Executive Director, Utah League of Cities and Towns, Board Member, UCAIR. 

The Bipartisan Utah Clean Air Caucus was started after a series of detestable inversions and consists of Republican and Democratic representatives and senators hailing from the Salt Lake valley to the rural corners of the state. The caucus seeks to address in earnest our state’s serious non-attainment issues and consider policies to mitigate Utah’s poor air quality. The current co-chair and original founding member, Rep. Joel Briscoe spoke today and shared the following,

“The Bipartisan Utah Clean Air Caucus was started ten years ago in 2013 in the winter of a serious PM2.5 inversion. The Clean Air Caucus meets several times every year to get up to speed on air quality issues and to work on policy and appropriations to tackle our state’s serious non-attainment issues and to mitigate Utah’s air quality which ranks as some of the worst in the nation during inversion season.” – Rep. Joel Briscoe, co-chair, Bi-Partisan Legislative Clean Air Caucus

Air quality is a complex issue. In Utah, air pollution issues are particularly fraught with unique challenges, including distinctive local topography, heavy transportation traffic, and a high density population. There is no simple solution to solving our air pollution challenges, but focusing on transportation makes common sense. Vehicle exhaust makes up about half of the air pollution in Utah, and unnecessary idling contributes a significant amount of emissions into our air shed each day. 

The Bi-partisan Clean Air Caucus was not the only active voice in the notable “bad inversion year” here in Utah the winter of 2013. Renowned Utah artist Pilar Pobil painted Under the Great Seal of the State of Utah in an artist effort to urge elected officials to take affirmative action. The painting shows legislators flying around the state capitol building, depicted as a beehive, far above the winter inversion and the people below are caught in smog. The citizens struggle in the smog while the flying legislators seem oblivious.

Pilar Pobil, Tammie Bostick in from of Pilar’s ‘Under the Great Seal of the State of Utah”

“Growing up on an idyllic Mediterranean island, I was immersed in the wonder of nature. I developed a strong sense of respect for our natural world and the need to protect it. In 2013, I was inspired to paint Under the Great Seal of the State of Utah after a particularly bad air inversion during the legislative session. I felt our elected officials could and should do more to clean our air and protect nature.” – Pilar Pobil, Utah Artist, “Under the Great Seal of the State of Utah”

Over 80 Utah fleets make a commitment each year with Utah Clean Cities, and the communities they serve, to operate Idle Free. Based on Utah Clean Cities 2021 annual report data, the Turn Your Key, Be Idle Free program reduced more than 200,000 lbs. of criteria pollutants in 2021. In total, the program reduced more than 13,942 tons of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the last year. That is equivalent to 1,183,139 gallons of gasoline. 

“Salt Lake City was one of the first cities in Utah to adopt an idle free ordinance. Something as simple as turning off your car when you’re waiting for the kids, or sitting at a drive-thru, is one easy way for everyone to do their part. This simple action of ‘turning your key to be idle free’ will go a long way to clean our air.” – Debbie Lyons, Director, Salt LakeCity Department of Sustainability

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Agone National Lab: EVs vs. Conventional Vehicles Webinar

 Argonne’s Science at Work webinar comparing EVs with conventional vehicles

 

For more details, check out the following materials:

 

Argonne National Laboratory

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Answers to questions asked during the webinar

  1. What type of crude oil is used for the comparison? Different crude oils have different refining needs.
    • Answer: Indeed, oil source matters since it can affect API gravity, sulfur content, transportation distances (and transit method), etc. The GREET model considers crude from multiple global sources including the United States, Canada (oil sands and conventional), Mexico, the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. We also account for a portion of ethanol within the fuel consistent with U.S. average conditions.
  1. How many miles are you assuming in your life cycle emissions?
    • Answer: Lifetime miles are based on average vehicle driving distance by vintage and survivability from the VISION model. For midsize cars in the U.S., this is 173,151 lifetime miles. Note that mileage serves to amortize the vehicle production burdens but does not impact the Fuel Cycle.
  1. I assume Natural Gas in this chart is just fossil. It does not include Renewable Natural Gas.
    • Answer: Yes, the chart only shows average natural gas in the U.S. We could also provide RNG.
  1. For electricity production, are the GHG emissions just associated at the power plant?
    • Answer: No, this is life cycle, thus it includes all aspects of fuel production and consumption. So, for this, and for every other fuel or material, this goes all the way back to extraction from earth and includes all processes used to provide a usable form of the fuel/material.
  1. Does this model also work for MD and HD commercial vehicles?
    • Answer: Yes, GREET also has well-to-wheel (WTW) results for many diverse MHDV, and further has the vehicle cycle for Class 6 Pickup and Delivery, and Class 8 Sleeper- and Day-cab MDHV, thus we have cradle-to-grave results for those 3 classes (multiple powertrains).
  1. Can you provide a similar analysis for resource depletion and mining waste during manufacturing, comparing BEVs to ICEVs?
    • Answer: GREET does not currently have resource depletion analyses.
  1. Can you comment on resource depletion and the effect of battery recycling?
    • Answer: GREET does not currently have resource depletion analyses. But the effect of battery recycling would be to reduce the rate at which resources are depleted.
  1. I’d be interested in seeing a GREET comparison with a conventional vehicle getting 50 mpg.
    • Answer: My back-of-the-envelope analysis indicates that improving the gasoline vehicle from 31 to 50 MPGGE (Miles per Gallon of Gasoline Equivalent) would reduce the life cycle GHG emissions to 275 g CO2e/mile (Grams CO2 Equivalent per Mile).
  1. How would a Hybrid compare with an EV?
    • Answer: A comparable hybrid would achieve ~46 MPGGE, so it would be slightly worse than the 50 MPGGE results noted above, but it would also have a battery, motor, generator, and electronic controller, which would add slightly to the vehicle cycle, but not nearly as much as the battery for the EV.
  1. Can you provide a similar analysis for all air-pollution (not just GHG, but including PM2.5, NOX, SOX, etc.)
    • Answer: We have such capabilities with the GREET model.
  1. I’d love to see a future seminar when the comparison is a Full Hybrid, PHEV and EV. I think everyone accepts the results for conventional ICE.
  1. Looking at the EV split on the last slide, I didn’t see any upstream emissions. Does this model also include the GHG emissions for production and maintenance of the different types of facilities and the overall life expectancy?
    • Answer: I believe the question is mistaken, the EVs only have upstream, but no tailpipe emissions. From the frame of the vehicle, all electricity emissions are upstream. We account for all emissions associated with fuel production and energy generation. We do not, in our baseline configuration, account for the construction and maintenance of infrastructure as this is amortized over a very large quantity of delivered product (electricity in this case) and is thus very small.
  1. How would this comparison look for an HEV or PHEV?
  1. How much energy is consumed recycling batteries?
    • Answer: That can be considered using Argonne’s EverBatt model. Within this analysis we use a conservative approach and assume that no recycling credits are provided for recycled batteries. https://www.anl.gov/egs/everbatt
  1. What does the landscape for recycling discharged EV vehicles look like?
    • Answer: This is outside the scope of this presentation, but Argonne’s ReCell Center (https://recellcenter.org/) is actively looking at advanced EV battery recycling approaches.
  1. How hard is it to swap the batteries in EVs?
    • Answer: This is beyond the scope of my analyses. But it has not yet been profitably achieved on a broad scale for EVs. This is more of a vehicle design issue coupled with a planning and logistics challenge than an LCA issue.
  1. How do you model environment impact of the increased competition for rare minerals with demand increasing and quality of ore decreasing?
    • Answer: For the GREET model, we use the best available public data to determine the energy and material input needs of all materials, this is typically static or retrospective in nature. However, as noted, increased demand for materials will place a pressure on global ores with the likely effect of lower ores grades. Such dynamic elements are not included for materials within GREET at present. The general observation, however, is that as ore grade decreases the amount of energy required per tonne of final material should increase (all other conditions being equal).

 

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Utah Hosts USDOT to Collect Feedback on their Charge Forward Initiative

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Under its ROUTES initiative, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) released Charging Forward: A Toolkit for Planning and Funding Rural Electric Mobility Infrastructure in February 2022 as a one-stop shop for rural entities looking to plan, fund, and implement EV charging infrastructure and projects. 

In partnership with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s (USDOT’s), Utah Clean Cities and Grand County Economic Development Office hosted one of these workshops with the goal to collect input on the rural electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure toolkit Charging Forward Toolkit directly from local rural leaders and communities. 

Grand County Economic Development helped to facilitate a meeting between stakeholders including the US Department of Transportation, the US Department of Energy, and the Utah Clean Cities Coalition on the prospect of electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure funding in our region as part of an EV corridor including Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho. Utah Clean Cities Coalition is serving as the prime of this project and their executive director, Tammie Bostick. 

USDOT is actively working with Clean Cities Coalitions to organize workshops with rural communities across the country to (1) obtain feedback on the toolkit content and inform a revised version, planned for Summer 2022; and (2) facilitate knowledge exchange within rural communities on getting started with EV charging projects. USDOT is seeking feedback on this first version of the toolkit—with a goal to release a revised version this summer. The workshops bring together 10-20 stakeholders from a single community or region, with participants representing diverse community and planning roles.

“We are excited to focus one of these workshops on Moab and surrounding areas. Being in Moab today is an incredible opportunity for all of rural Utah. Today, We bring together  leadership with the possible vision of electrified transportation. Our goal in bringing resources to rural Utah communities is to ensure equity, funding access, and the tools to secure opportunities to build out zero emission technologies and renewable fuels” said Tammie Bostick, Executive Director of Utah Clean Cities. 

This workshop is also a part of the Utah Clean Cities Coalitions Drive Clean Rural USA – Rural Utah Project focused on helping rural counties transition to cleaner fuels and vehicles. This project provides outreach, education, and technical assistance to local county decision makers to support opportunities for transitioning fleets to cleaner fuels and vehicles. Support county governments transition their fleets to cleaner fuels and vehicles. 

For more information on this workshop and projects, please contact Tammie Bostick at tammie.bostick@utahcleancities.org

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Atlas Disposal Ribbon Cutting

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Salt Lake City, UT, March 22, 2022 —  Utah Clean Cities rallied with key Utah leadership in the transportation sector and with clean air advocates today at the Atlas Disposal green-fleet ribbon cutting in west Salt Lake.  The event was moderated by Free Reyes of Lancer Energy and the speakers included: Thom Carter, Governor’s Energy Advisor; Kim Frost, Utah Clean Air Partnership; Tammie Bostick, Utah Clean Cities; and Dell Loy Hansen, Atlas founder.  Over sixty clean air advocates and transportation leaders toured the new facility and applauded the breadth and depth of ingenuity in this modern facility with large solar arrays and high tech fueling options.

Atlas Disposal has invested over $5 Million in a new Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling station and fleet of 16 CNG Refuse Trucks. This new fueling station is located on their property in west Salt Lake City off of I-80 near the airport.  The station can fuel up to 40 refuse trucks simultaneously and includes a public access station for fast-filling CNG/RNG at 14 GGE per minute– making it the fastest CNG filling station in Utah.

Using state-of-the-art technologies with fast-fueling innovation is what sets this advanced station above the rest for fleet satisfaction and environmental stewardship commitment,“The super station we are touring today is a testimony of sound business practices and regard to the carbon-constrained air shed along Utah’s Wasatch front,” stated Tammie Bostick, director of Utah Clean Cities, a non-profit organization dedicated to clean fuels, clean air and clean strategies, “ We here at the Atlas station, renewable fuels at the pump, renewable energy in the form of solar electricity, and a off-grid fast charger from FreeWire technologies that operates on battery storage for resilience and shaves peak energy demands for efficiency.” added Bostick. The fueling station and electric vehicle DC fast charger uses electricity from its on-site 325kW solar canopy array with 400kWH of battery storage that has the peak output capability of 120kW.

The new technologies in a modern CNG fleet have significantly lower emissions than its diesel counterparts: 50% less fine particulate matter and 90% less carbon monoxide. “We all share ownership and responsibility for Utah’s air quality. We applaud Atlas for leading its industry by making this significant investment in new clean natural gas refuse trucks to help contribute to a better air quality solution.” stated Kim Frost, executive director at Utah Clean Air Partnership (UCAIR).

Nick Sikich, president at Atlas Disposal was closely involved with the decisions that led to the Atlas mission to commit fully to renewable natural gas and electric fueling, “There is no silver bullet to solving Utah’s air quality, but every small change adds to a collective bigger step toward better health, a better economy, and better overall quality of life for all of us. Atlas Disposal is excited to announce a new eco-friendlier fleet of 16 CNG Refuse trucks and a new innovative CNG/RNG fueling station that is open to the public. Lowering our emissions is of utmost importance to us as a company and guides our overall operating decisions.”

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About Atlas Disposal

Atlas Disposal Industries was established in March of 1998 in response to the new recycling mandates that were passed by the State of California. With an active team focused on educating local businesses about their recycling potential, Atlas emerged as the fastest growing waste management and recycling removal company in the area. Today, Atlas Disposal is one of the largest waste management and recycling service providers with operations in Sacramento, Salt Lake City, and Phoenix.  Atlas Disposal has the advantage of local customer service and billing to respond quickly to any questions or concerns that customers might have.  ReFuel Energy Partners, a division of Atlas Disposal, currently operates public CNG fueling stations in Sacramento, San Jose, and now Salt Lake.  Atlas Disposal believes in being good stewards of the communities they serve by letting their core value of environmental preservation help guide their business decisions.

About Utah Clean Cities

Web: utahcleancities.org

Through the Beyond Zero Green Fleet Program, Utah Clean Cities, UCC, seeks to recognize those in Utah’s transportation sectors who have committed to developing zero-emission fleet goals through the adoption and expansion of alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

The mission of the Utah Clean Cities Coalition is to advance the energy, economic, and environmental security of the United States by supporting local decisions to adopt practices that reduce the use of petroleum in the transportation sector. Working closely with the Department of Energy’s Clean Cities programs, federal and state government, as well as our local stakeholders, we leverage our resources to bring funding into Utah to support the development and deployment of advanced fuel infrastructure and vehicles with an emphasis on renewable energies and technologies.

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US DOT Issues Guidance for State DOTS to Implement the National EV Formula Program

Originally posted via Joint Office of Energy and Transportation 

NEWS ALERT: US DOT ISSUES GUIDANCE FOR STATE DOTS TO IMPLEMENT THE NATIONAL EV FORMULA PROGRAM

DOT Issues Guidance for States

Feb. 10, 2022

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) released guidance for state departments of transportation related to implementation of the National Electric Vehicle Infrastructure (NEVI) Formula Program. The NEVI Formula Program will provide dedicated funding to states to strategically deploy EV charging infrastructure and establish an interconnected network to facilitate data collection, access, and reliability.

 

DOT also published the Request for Nominations for the 6th round of alternative fuel corridor designations.

 

View the complete announcement here. 

 


 

Memorandum of Understanding Creates Joint Office

Dec. 14, 2021

U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm and U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg signed a memorandum of understanding to create the Joint Office of Energy and Transportation to support the deployment of $7.5 billion from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to build out a national electric vehicle charging network that can build public confidence, with a focus on filling gaps in rural, disadvantaged, and hard-to-reach locations.

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Charging Forward: A Toolkit for Planning and Funding Rural Electric Mobility Infrastructure

Originally published through U.S. Department of Transportation

President Biden, U.S. Department of Transportation Releases Toolkit to Help Rural Communities Build Out Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure

Wednesday, February 2, 2022

Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to Provide $7.5 Billion for EV Charging Network Across America 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Transportation today released a new, free resource to help rural communities across the country take full advantage of federal funding for electric vehicle (EV) charging stations. The guide, titled Charging Forward: A Toolkit for Planning and Funding Rural Electric Mobility Infrastructure, can help connect community members, towns, businesses, planning agencies, and others with partners needed for these projects. President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law includes a total of $7.5 billion to build out a nationwide network of 500,000 electric vehicle chargers.

The toolkit contains best practices for planning EV charging networks and tips to navigate federal funding and financing to help make these projects a reality. DOT will also be holding workshops with rural communities to utilize the toolkit most effectively.

This toolkit is being released in anticipation of the distribution of $7 billion in funds to accelerate the deployment of a national electric vehicle charging network from the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. Of these funds, $4.75 billion will be distributed by formula to states, and an additional $2.5 billion will be distributed through a competitive grant program that will support innovative approaches and ensure that charger deployment meets Administration priorities such as supporting rural charging, improving local air quality and increasing EV charging access in disadvantaged communities. Together, this is the largest-ever U.S. investment in EV charging and will be a transformative down payment on the transition to a zero-emission future.

“Drivers in rural areas often have the longest commutes and spend the most money on gas, which means big benefits from having access to electric cars and pickup trucks if they are affordable and easy to charge where they live and drive,” said Secretary Pete Buttigieg. “The investments in the President’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for a national EV charging network are an important step toward ensuring that EVs aren’t a luxury item and that everyone in America can benefit from clean transportation.”

The Department of Transportation, along with the Department of Energy and the White House are conducting outreach and providing resources including this new toolkit to help ensure all Americans, including those in rural, disadvantaged, and hard-to-reach locations, benefit from EV technology.

This toolkit follows other examples of recent progress towards expansion of EV infrastructure including a memorandum of understanding signed by Secretary Buttigieg and U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm, which sets the stage for the two agencies to collaborate on implementation of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law’s electric vehicle provisions.

Further, today’s announcement follows progress on the Biden-Harris Administration delivering the benefits of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to rural communities. Last week, DOT announced more than $1.2 billion for the Appalachian Development Highway System. Yesterday, the Department of Interior announced $1.15 billion to help 26 states cap and remediate orphan oil and gas wells that will help many rural areas.  Last month, DOT also announced a historic investment in bridges, including off system bridges that greatly benefit rural communities

The toolkit was developed as part of the Rural Opportunities to Use Transportation for Economic Success (ROUTES) Initiative at USDOT, which coordinates rural infrastructure policy at the Department. The ROUTES Initiative was first created in 2019 and codified in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.  ROUTES provides technical assistance and easy-to-access resources for rural transportation stakeholders, including this toolkit. More information on the ROUTES Initiative can be found at www.transportation.gov/rural.

The Department will also host a webinar to present the toolkit in more detail on February 9 at 1:30 PM ET. The webinar is free to attend, register here.

Over the coming weeks and months, USDOT will hold additional workshops with rural communities and stakeholders to obtain feedback on the toolkit and provide information to help rural communities get started with electric vehicle charging projects. An updated toolkit will be available this summer that incorporates feedback from these workshops, expanded information on new programs, and new information on topics such as transit and school bus electrification.

Updates on the revised toolkit and other rural EV resources will be provided at www.transportation.gov/rural/ev.

The toolkit is available here: www.transportation.gov/rural/ev/toolkit

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Sandy City Launches Sustainable Sandy Initiative; Unveils New EV Chargers

Learn more about the rollout of EV chargers throughout Sandy City!